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Touching Stories

If a dog was your teacher

If a dog was your teacher,
these are some of the lessons you might learn…


  • When loved ones come home, always run to greet them
  • Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride
  • Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face,
    to be pure ecstasy
     
  • When it’s in your best interest,
    practice obedience
  • Let others know when they’ve invaded your territory
  • Take naps and stretch before rising
  • Run romp and play daily
     
  • Thrive on attention and let people touch you
  • Avoid biting, when a simple growl will do
  • On warm days stop to lie on your back on the grass
  • On hot days drink lots of water and lay under a shady tree
  • When you’re happy dance around and wag your entire body
     
  • No matter how often you’re scolded,
    don’t buy into the guilt thing and pout,
    run right back and make friends
     
  • Delight in the simple joy of a long walk
  • Eat with gusto and enthusiasm
  • Stop when you have had enough
  • Be loyal
  • Never pretend to be something you’re not
     
  • If what you want lies buried,
    dig until you find it
  • When someone is having a bad day,
    be silent….
    …sit close by
    …and nuzzle them gently.

Author Unknown

{ 21 comments }

Dearest grandmama

Hi all, I would like to share a story with you, a person who has been a source of inspiration to each and everyone of our family member.

She is (was rather, she is no more) my grandmama. She was an affectionate woman who could win over anyone with her undying love, no matter what. Let me narrate to you, the story of her life, the trauma that no woman should ever undergo!

She was the eldest of a family of 7 girls and 1 boy. Of these, 2 children died shortly after birth. Right now, only 2 of them are alive.

At the age of 16, my grandma got married as a second wife to a 40 year old man. She lost her husband 1 year after her wedding. By God’s grace she had a son whom she considered a solace. But that didn’t last, as the son passed away shortly too! Ultimately, by the age of 25 she lost her entire family! Nevertheless, she then dedicated her life towards the upbringing of each and every child in the family. This was the reason she was loved and respected by everyone in our family.

Last year, by this same time, my marriage was fixed. Being the oldest grandchild in my family, she was very happy and said she would bring up my kid too! I was in tears and said of course you will have to! Shortly before my engagement, she had a fall one night when sleeping. It left her right hand fractured. There began all the trouble. She was 83 years old by then.

At my engagement function, all she could do was sit quietly in one place. It was a hard hitting reality for all of us since we got used to seeing her doing the entire household chores all by herself!

There was hardly a month left for my wedding. She developed a strange mental depression since that time, imagining things, fearing death, longing to see my wedding and the like. All of us assured her that she would be the first person to bless me at my wedding. But nature is inevitable as we all know.

She was admitted in the ICU for nearly 20 days. All day we would stay at the hospital, praying for her. One fine day it happened-what we all feared. She was no more, and left all of us teary-eyed.

My dad was the eldest child in the family, so naturally he had to do the rites. But our family stopped him since I had my wedding the next month. We (me, dad, mum and sis) weren’t allowed to even see her face! Imagine our plight!

At my wedding, her garlanded photo was in front of me and my husband. I was speechless, moved to tears. I knew, my dearest grandmama will bless me as ever!

Even today, we don’t feel her loss, I only feel why she isn’t around to share our joys and sorrows.

I’d like to conclude by saying not only parents, grandparents need our affection and care! They are precious, do not lose them at any cost!!

By visitor Shenba Srinivasan

{ 33 comments }

The miracle of love, true story!

Like any good mother, when Karen found out that another baby was on the way, she did what she could to help her 3-year-old son, Michael, prepare for a new sibling.

The new baby was going be a girl, and day after day, night after night, Michael sang to his sister in Mommy’s tummy. He was building a bond of love with his little sister before he even met her.

The pregnancy progressed normally for Karen, an active member of the the Creek United Methodist Church in Morristown, Tennessee, USA.

In time, the labor pains came. Soon it was every five minutes, every three, every minute. But serious complications arose during delivery and Karen found herself in hours of labor.

Finally, after a long struggle, Michael’s little sister was born. But she was in very serious condition. With a siren howling in the night, the ambulance rushed the infant to the neonatal intensive care unit at St. Mary’s Hospital, Knoxville, Tennessee.

The days inched by. The little girl got worse. The pediatrician had to tell the parents there was very little hope. Be prepared for the worst. Karen and her husband contacted a local cemetery about a burial plot. They had fixed up a special room in their house for their new baby they found themselves having to plan for a funeral.

Michael, however, kept begging his parents to let him see his sister. “I want to sing to her,” he kept saying.

Week two in intensive care looked as if a funeral would come before the week was over. Michael kept nagging about singing to his sister, but kids are never allowed in Intensive Care.

Karen decided to take Michael whether they liked it or not. If he didn’t see his sister right then, he may never see her alive. She dressed him in an oversized scrub suit and marched him into ICU. He looked like a walking laundry basket.

The head nurse recognized him as a child and bellowed, “Get that kid out of here now. No children are allowed.”

The mother rose up strong in Karen and the usually mild-mannered lady glared steel-eyed right into the head nurse’s eyes, her lips a firm line, “He is not leaving until he sings to his sister.”

Then Karen towed Michael to his sister’s bedside. He gazed at the tiny infant losing the battle to live. After a moment, he began tossing. In the pure-hearted voice of a 3-year-old, Michael sang:

“You are my sunshine, my only sunshine, you make me happy when skies are gray.”

Instantly the baby girl seemed to respond. The pulse rate began to calm down and became steady.

“Keep on singing, Michael,” encouraged Karen with tears in her eyes.

“You never know, dear, how much I love you, please don’t take my sunshine away.”

As Michael sang to his sister, the baby’s ragged, strained breathing became as smooth as a kitten’s purr. “Keep on singing, sweetheart.”

“The other night, dear, as I lay sleeping, I dreamed I held you in my arms”.

Michael’s little sister began to relax as rest, healing rest, seemed to sweep over her. “Keep singing, Michael.” Tears had now conquered the face of the bossy head nurse. Karen glowed.

“You are my sunshine, my only sunshine. Please don’t take my sunshine away…”

The next day,…the very next day…the little girl was well enough to go home.

Author Unknown
Story submitted by Cindy.


Never give up on the people you love. Love is so incredibly powerful.

– The Woman’s Day Magazine called it, “the miracle of a brother’s song”.
– The medical staff called it a miracle.
– Karen called it a miracle of God’s love.

This is a true story happened in 1992 in Tennessee, USA. The baby girl’s name is Marlee (picture on the right). As of 2012, Marlee is 20 years old and she thinks she is normal like any other girl.

{ 64 comments }

How big is One?

As a man walked a desolate beach one cold, gray morning he began to see another figure, far in the distance. Slowly the two approached each other, and he could make out a local native who kept leaning down, picking something up and throwing it out into the water. Time and again he hurled things into the ocean.

As the distance between them continued to narrow, the man could see that the native was picking up starfish that had been washed upon the beach and, one at a time, was throwing them back into the water.

Puzzled, the man approached the native and asked what he was doing. “I’m throwing these starfish back into the ocean. You see, it’s low tide right now and all of these starfish have been washed up onto the shore. If I don’t throw them back into the sea, they’ll die up here from lack of oxygen.”

“But there must be thousands of starfish on this beach,” the man replied. “You can’t possibly get to all of them. There are just too many. And this same thing is probably happening on hundreds of beaches all up and down this coast. Can’t you see that you can’t possibly make a difference?”

The local native smiled, bent down and picked up another starfish, and as he threw it back into the sea he replied, “Made a difference to that one!

Author Unknown

Each of us is but one person: limited, burdened with our own cares and responsibilities. We may feel there is so much to be done, and we have so little to give. We’re usually short of everything, especially time and money.

When we leave this shore, there will still be millions of starfish stranded on the beach. Maybe we can’t change the whole world, but there isn’t one of us who can’t help change one person’s whole world. One at a time. We can make a difference.

{ 12 comments }

A dish of ice cream

In the days when an ice cream sundae cost much less, a 10 year old boy entered a hotel coffee shop and sat at a table. A waitress put a glass of water in front of him.

“How much is an ice cream sundae?”

“50 cents,” replied the waitress.

The little boy pulled his hand out of his pocket and studied a number of coins in it.

“How much is a dish of plain ice cream?” he inquired. Some people were now waiting for a table and the waitress was a bit impatient.

“35 cents,” she said brusquely.

The little boy again counted the coins. “I’ll have the plain ice cream,” he said.

The waitress brought the ice cream, put the bill on the table and walked away. The boy finished the ice cream, paid the cashier and departed.

When the waitress came back, she began wiping down the table and then swallowed hard at what she saw.

There, placed neatly beside the empty dish, were 15 cents – her tip.

Author Unknown

Moral: don’t judge the book by its cover!

{ 14 comments }